How To Make Cornhole Bags

You will need a set of 8 cornhole bags to play a game of cornhole, with 4 bags of one color, and 4 of another. Unlike making your own cornhole boards, where you can get all the materials at your local hardware store, making your own set of cornhole bags might take a little more work to track down all the proper "ingredients" to make a really sturdy set of cornhole bags.

I have found, that unless you already have a nice sewing machine, and are pretty skilled in using it, it might be a better bet to just go ahead and buy your bags on-line. There are numerous retailers that sell high quality cornhole bags at a very reasonable price.

You will need the following tools that can be found at most arts and craft stores.

sewing machine
fabric-cutting mat w/ grid
fabric cutters or scissors
digital scale

You will then need the following supplies

duck cloth – 7’’ x 7’’squares (16 total, 8 per color)
2 spools of thread (one for each color of bag)
fabric glue
feed-grade dried corn (8 lbs)

Make sure you get the good quality duck cloth. It is a canvas-type “outdoor” fabric that really holds up well. Some people will try to skimp and get another kind of fabric, but it never holds up as well. Most fabric stores carry duck cloth, but I had a real hard time finding the specific colors I was looking for. Most stores only carry a few colors, so you might have to go on-line to find the ones you are looking for.

Feed-grade dried corn is available in most feed stores. Make sure you ask for whole corn. However, depending on what part of the country you live in, finding a feed store might also be problematic. Living in a metropolitan area in Florida, as I do, it wasn't easy finding a feed store. To make matters worse, I never had much luck finding an on-line supplier of dried corn, and if you did, shipping makes it not near as cost effective.

If you are still determined to make your own cornhole bags at this point, then take a deep breath, gather up all your patience, and lets get started!

If you haven't already, you need to cut your duck cloth fabric into 7" by 7" squares. When finished you should have 8 squares of one color and 8 squares for your other color. Now, place two squares of the same color together so that their edges line up exactly. Each seam should be 1/2 inch in from the edge. Cornhole bags take a good beating, so its highly recommended to double-stitch your bags. If your sewing machine has the feature, then you can actually set it to double-stitch all at once. Those who just have a basic sewing machine will need to sew a side completely, then repeat again on the same side right next to the first seam in order to get the double-stitch. Make sure you back-stitch at all the corners to prevent the thread from unraveling. Go ahead and sew as indicated above for only three of the four sides, but be sure to leave one side open. You'll need a hole for getting the corn into the bag. If you want some extra stability in your cornhole bags, I would run a little fabric glue along all the seams at this point. After the glue dries, turn the bag inside out.

Now, measure the corn you will need for each bag. Each cornhole bag should weigh right around 16oz, and since the cloth weighs about 0.5 oz, you should weigh out about 15.5oz of corn for each bag. Fold the open ends of the bag, inward half an inch, to match the rest of the seams you have already finished. Put your corn in the bag, sew the opening up, remembering to double stitch, and presto, you have a completed, ready to toss, cornhole bag!

It will take several attempts to get the process down, but if you are a skilled at the art of sewing, you should get the hang of it pretty quickly. Or, you could be like me, and break a couple of needles, scream a hoard of expletives, get very frustrated, and eventually go on-line and in a couple days have your cornhole bags in hand. Either way you choose, get out there and start tossing!